BRW School Architecture

HOW TO HAVE A HAPPY, HEALTHY SCHOOL BUILDING FOR MANY YEARS TO COME

The process of deciding whether building owners will benefit from choices that increase costs up-front but provide cost savings down the road

Do we invest now in more durable flooring that takes little maintenance, or do we go for a less expensive flooring material that requires more frequent, labor-intensive maintenance?  Do we pay more for a roofing material that deflects heat or do we buy a less expensive roof that results in higher air conditioning bills?

In an ideal world, we would always opt for the more durable, lower maintenance materials.  After all, building maintenance budgets for school facilities have been just as hard-hit as every other budget.  Construction budgets, however, haven’t been immune to cuts either, so school administrators must weigh carefully the costs and benefits of various building materials and systems before deciding which option to take.

At BRW, we are firm believers that building a durable, low-maintenance, energy-smart school facility is one of the wisest investments a school district can make.  In our experience, the up-front costs are made up many times over in lower heating and cooling bills, less manpower (i.e. custodial salaries), lower water bills, and overall lower maintenance costs.  One of the key elements in long term facility costs is the cost of the energy it consumes.

When designing any building for maximum energy efficiency, the four main components are 1) the building envelope, 2) interior finishes, 3) building mechanical systems, and 4) water-saving devices.

Depending on local climate, existing regulations, and local priorities, one of these may be more important than others.  But, in general, our goal is to build the most energy-efficient building we can while staying within our budget.  Designing an energy-efficient building is the architectural equivalent of flossing, eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise: it’s a little investment now that pays off immensely when middle age hits.

The building envelope: This includes the roofing material, insulation, flashing (the waterproofing system that diverts water that inevitably infiltrates the wall system), and exterior materials.  Each of these elements has a wide range of choices that offer both durability and lower maintenance.

Interior finishes: This includes flooring, wall finishes, and ceilings.  Because of the extreme wear and tear on school floors, this single decision can mean dramatic savings (or costs) down the road.  Newer choices, such as diamond-polished concrete, epoxy terrazzo, or porcelain ceramic tile, are a wonderful alternative to vinyl composition tile, which requires periodic stripping and waxing, or carpet which quickly shows wear.

Building mechanical systems: There are a variety of heating and cooling systems, such as geothermal systems, that offer long-term savings.  But there are efficient, easy-to-maintain, traditional rooftop or central plant systems that can be good choices when geothermal isn’t an option.  With lighting, the goal is to maximize daylight harvesting while also controlling cooling costs.

Water-saving devices: Given the increasing demand for water, combined with Mother Nature’s unpredictability with increased concern for potential use restrictions, installing water-benefits systems throughout the school offers almost instantly realized savings.  Low-flow or dual-flush toilets in the bathroom, as well as electronic sensor faucets, can bring dramatic savings.  Outside, xeriscaping with hearty, native plants and drip irrigation is undoubtedly the way to go.

Stay tuned for more in-depth discussions of each of these topics.  If you can’t wait, though, and you would like to talk with us now about designing a low-maintenance energy-smart school in your area, please contact us at www.brwarch.com.

POSTED BY: Jeffrey Choyce, AIA and Lisa Lamkin, AIA

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